Towns with only one resident?

Towns with only one resident?


  Imagine living in a town where YOU are the only resident. It sounds crazy, right?

 

  Today, let’s take a look at four towns with a population of “1”.


1.  Jordan River, Canada

Source


  Wouldn’t it be nice to live in a town on the beach? It sounds like a dream; waking every day to nothing but the sounds of nature and a beautiful view. Well, as great as it sounds, pollution, erosion, rising water levels, earthquakes, and even tsunamis have made places like this less than ideal to live.

1.  Jordan River, Canada

Source



  Wouldn’t it be nice to live in a town on the beach? It sounds like a dream; waking every day to nothing but the sounds of nature and a beautiful view. Well, as great as it sounds, pollution, erosion, rising water levels, earthquakes, and even tsunamis have made places like this less than ideal to live.


  Jordan River, near Vancouver, is a town that faced its demise to the forces of nature. Frequent earthquakes causing floods made all of the towns inhabitants leave their beloved homes; all but one. The only resident to remain is 72-year-old Hugh Pite, who refuses to move. Hugh wants to stay to enjoy the surfing.



  Yup, Hugh Pite is a surfer who first learned while living abroad in Australia in his early 20’s. When he returned to Vancouver Island, he came across the surfing community in Jordan River, purchasing a home there in 1987. “I’m right across the road from the water and I go out there and I go surfing,” said Pite. “If I didn’t have the place there, I’d have to drive an hour and a half each way, which is in my opinion far more dangerous than the very slight chance of an earthquake.”


2. Monowi, Nebraska, US

Source


  Elsie Eiler is now the most admired, smartest, wealthiest, best-looking, youngest, and the oldest person to reside in this little town; because she is the only one left. When you are the only resident of a community, you can give yourself any title you like. Eiler, who is 77, is the lone inhabitant of Monowi. There were two people living in the town in 2000, with the other being Eiler’s husband, Rudy. Sadly, he passed in 2004. “We probably have the record by going down in population 50 percent,” Eiler quipped. “I chose to stay here after my husband died. It’s home.”


  As the town’s only resident, she acts as Mayor. She also granted herself a liquor license, and pays taxes to herself. She is however required to produce a municipal road plan every year, in order to secure state funding for the village’s street lights; all four of them. Most of the town is empty, but it does have a 5,000-volume library named “Rudy’s Library”, founded in memory of Rudy Eiler. Oh, and of course that liquor license Elsie granted herself goes to use. She runs a tavern in Monowi, drawing regular customers from as far as 80 miles away.

2. Monowi, Nebraska, US

Source


  As the town’s only resident, she acts as Mayor. She also granted herself a liquor license, and pays taxes to herself. She is however required to produce a municipal road plan every year, in order to secure state funding for the village’s street lights; all four of them. Most of the town is empty, but it does have a 5,000-volume library named “Rudy’s Library”, founded in memory of Rudy Eiler. Oh, and of course that liquor license Elsie granted herself goes to use. She runs a tavern in Monowi, drawing regular customers from as far as 80 miles away.



  Elsie Eiler is now the most admired, smartest, wealthiest, best-looking, youngest, and the oldest person to reside in this little town; because she is the only one left. When you are the only resident of a community, you can give yourself any title you like. Eiler, who is 77, is the lone inhabitant of Monowi. There were two people living in the town in 2000, with the other being Eiler’s husband, Rudy. Sadly, he passed in 2004. “We probably have the record by going down in population 50 percent,” Eiler quipped. “I chose to stay here after my husband died. It’s home.”


3. Cass, New Zealand

Source


  “I didn’t want to come here in the beginning to be honest,” said the town’s only resident, Barrie Drummond.

   When Mr. Drummond was offered a job in Cass, he never thought he’d last more than two years in the small town, but is now the last remaining resident.


  He works for KiwiRail, and is responsible for the highest section of the track linking Christchurch to Greymouth, and said that he grew so close to the towns few residents in the past, that he decided to stay indefinitely. Eventually the town’s population decreased over the years, but Drummond stayed behind. He said that he really doesn’t mind the solidarity, even in the absence of women. He has also never been married; go figure. Twenty-five years after his initial move to Cass, and despite being the Selwyn District town’s only resident, he says he has no plans to leave anytime soon.

 


4. Buford, Wyoming, US

Source


  PhinDeli Town Buford is an unincorporated community in Albany County, Wyoming, located between Laramie and Cheyenne on Interstate 80. It has an elevation of 8,000 feet (2,400 m), making it the highest populated settlement along the First Transcontinental Railroad. The town was originally named Buford – in honor of Major General John Buford, a Union cavalry officer who fought during the Civil War – but in 2013, the town was purchased by a Vietnamese owner, who re-branded it as “PhinDeli Town Buford.” The postal addresses, however, still bears the town’s original name.


  In 1992, Don Sammons purchased the town, and as of 2013 the population had dwindled to only one; just him. He had moved to Buford in 1980 with his wife and son, and in 1992 became owner, but in 1995 his wife passed away. Afterwards, his son moved away in 2007, making Don Buford’s only resident.


  The local convenience store, gas station, and modular home were put up for sale when Sammons got tired of his solidarity, choosing to move closer to his son. He sold the town on April 5, 2012, for $900,000.


  At first, I thought it would be amazing to have a town all to myself, but it does sound like it would get lonesome after a while. While escaping the everyday “craziness” – and all the people involved in that “crazy” – sounds nice, it’s our interactions with others that make life enjoyable.

  But, with that being said, I still wouldn’t mind having a vacation town to go to now and again when people piss me off!


N.

N.


Like this article? Drop your thoughts in the comments below!