Found Wood Sculptures

Found Wood Sculptures


 I’ve come across some unique wood sculptures, but nothing quite like the ‘Found Wood’ sculptures created by artist Eyevan Tumbleweed.


  I’m always on the lookout for new, interesting, and unique art and artists. By chance, while scrolling through my Instagram one day, I came across the most bizarre wood sculptures I had ever seen, created by an intriguing individual, and an even more incredible method.

  Bennett Ewing, aka Eyevan Tumbleweed isn’t a wood sculptor in the traditional sense. Rather than carving wood, he collects bits of it in his travels, eventually piecing them together in a sort of natural collage, creating faces with fantastic expressions.


  From a young age, Eyevan couldn’t help but perceive faces in natural objects; in the patterns of trees, mountains, and so on. I can relate, as I tend to see faces where others just see a smudge, or a pile of junk as well. In 2002, he began an exploratory method of mimicking those natural faces, and from there he’s kept creating.




“My primary focus with the medium has been to create a series of relief faces from non-carved, naturally colored wood that I collect myself from nature’s various nooks and crannies.”    Eyevan Tumbleweed



  Most artists create pieces using materials that can be easily replaced. Eyevan, however, can’t just go to a craft store and purchase more supplies. This is what I find most intriguing about his craft. He has collected materials from mountains, deserts, swamps, forests, rivers, and beaches. Some of his past works have featured weathered woods from over thirty-five U.S. States, Mexico, Canada, and even Ireland.


  Not only does Eyevan create amazing faces with these bits of wood, he also truly captures the essence of emotions that a face can display. While each of his wall-hanging sculptures has a mystical, mythical aspect to it, they also beautifully display a range of intelligent sentiment.


“I find facial expressions, both subtle and overt, have a unique ability to visually bridge the gap between thought and feeling.”      Eyevan Tumbleweed



  Through his travels, Eyevan has found a connection with nature, and believes that an artist’s job is to create something from its components, by re-arranging them into something new.

  He states, “any material one uses to create art comes from the earth… I consider my art to be a sort of raw testament to that. 


  Another curious component of Eyevan’s technique is the patience it takes to complete even one sculpture. Since every piece of wood must be found, he may not find the right pieces to finish a project for an extended period of time. He also told me that even though he is always learning new tricks, he has not completed more than 5 pieces in a single year. Now that is patience.


  Even more than that, it’s bewildering to think where each piece of wood may have actually come from. “Undoubtedly some of the wood I find has been around for quite some time; much longer than a human life span. Each piece of wood I find on the shores of the Atlantic or Pacific oceans has likely had its own journey, and I find that particularly cool to think about.” 



  Eyevan studied art and writing at Prescott College, Massachusetts College of Art, and Northeastern University, and has an art intensive background of over 20 years in various creative mediums, not limited to visual arts. Now at 35, and having 15 years in his found wood sculpture experience, it’s safe to say he’s found his niche. The wall hanging relief faces in his series consist of over a dozen finished works, and blend fantasy with reality; impressionism with ornate design.



  What I respect most about Eyevan’s unique artistic method is the pure truth about art that is portrayed. Art is not about fancy materials, or even knowing exactly what the outcome of a project will be. Art is an exploratory journey, and a connection to emotion. What better way to express emotion than to connect with the world around you, experience it wholeheartedly, and use what is found to share that connection?


  Overall, each piece of wood used in these pieces is really a memento of an experience in Eyevan’s life, and a testament to the vast possibilities of life. So, like Eyevan, keep exploring, keep experiencing, and – most importantly – keep creating!


N.

N.


  To see more incredible works by Eyevan Tumbleweed, follow the links below!




Like what you’ve seen here? You can help keep N.N.H running smoothly through contributions below, or just show appreciation by buying N. a shot! Thanks!


Like this article? Drop your thoughts in the comments below!